Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 How the brain detects the emotions of others

This story is from the category The Brain
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 23/05/2008

Monash University (Australia) researchers have found that people who are good at interpreting facial expressions have more active mirror neuron systems.

Mirror neurons are brain cells that fire both when you do something and when you watch someone else do the same thing.

Because they allow us to mimic what others are doing, it is thought that these neurons may be responsible for why we can feel empathy, or understand others' intentions and states of mind. People with autism, for instance, show reduced mirror neuron activity during social cognition tasks.

To determine that, volunteers were tested on their ability to recognize faces and judge emotions in pictures, and on the "motor potential" in their thumb muscles: how much the thumb was influenced to move just by watching another thumb moving.

Volunteers who were better at judging people's emotions had higher mirror neuron activity in the thumb task. There was no correlation between recognizing faces and this activity.

See the full Story via external site: www.newscientist.com



Most recent stories in this category (The Brain):

04/02/2017: HKU scientists utilise innovative neuroimaging approach to unravel complex brain networks

26/01/2017: Personality linked to 'differences in brain structure'

12/01/2017: Donkey Kong used to Help Guide New Approaches in Neuroscience

10/12/2016: Doctors use deep-brain ultrasound therapy to treat tremors

17/02/2015: Hearing experts break sound barrier for children born without hearing nerve

17/02/2015: Smoking thins vital part of brain

05/02/2015: Intracranial Stimulation Proved Efficient in the Recovery of Learning and Memory in Rats

05/02/2015: Repeated head blows linked to smaller brain volume and slower processing speeds