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 VR Keyhole Surgeon Training to Help EU Working Time Directives

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Date posted: 25/01/2009

A Cochrane Systematic Review has determined that trainee surgeons who add virtual reality based training to standard 'apprenticeship' training in key-hole surgery learn more quickly, work with greater accuracy and have less errors than those with no VR training.

This is key to the drive to adopt VR training for surgeons, as this method of training, resulting in a sharp decrease in the number of hours required to train new skills, may be essential to help professionals stay sharp whilst obeying work week hour-limits set by European legislation.

The Royal College of Surgeons runs training courses that let a surgeon see what a procedure involves. With the arrival of desktop computing that has high graphic capability, software developers have built programs that enable the trainee to interact with the images. "This greater level of involvement gives the possibility that surgeons will be able to develop skills more rapidly," said Kurinchi Gurusamy, who works at the University Department of Surgery at the Royal Free Hospital, London.

"If we are going to meet the requirements of the European Working Time Directive, which effectively decreases the time available for training surgeons, as well as the Department of Health's modernising medical careers initiative, we need to develop highly efficient means of teaching new surgical skills. Virtual reality techniques may fulfil that need," said Kurinchi.

See the full Story via external site: www.sciencedaily.com



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