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 Head movement is more important than gender in nonverbal communication

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Date posted: 26/05/2009

It is well known that people use head motion during conversation to convey a range of meanings and emotions, and that women use more active head motion when conversing with each other than men use when they talk with each other.

When women and men converse together, the men use a little more head motion and the women use a little less. But the men and women might be adapting because of their gender-based expectations or because of the movements they perceive from each other.

What would happen if you could change the apparent gender of a conversant while keeping all of the motion dynamics of head movement and facial expression?

Using new videoconferencing technology, a team of psychologists and computer scientists - led by Steven Boker, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia - were able to switch the apparent gender of study participants during conversation and found that head motion was more important than gender in determining how people coordinate with each other while engaging in conversation.

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



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