Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Hacking the Smart Grid

This story is from the category Connectivity
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 08/08/2010

The hurried deployment of smart-grid technology could leave critical infrastructure and private homes vulnerable to hackers. Security experts at the Black Hat conference in Las Vegas last week warned that smart-grid hardware and software lacks the necessary safeguards to protect against meddling.

Utilities are being encouraged to install this smart-grid technology--network-connected devices to help intelligently monitor and manage power usage--through funding from the U.S. government's 2009 stimulus package. The smart systems could save energy and automatically adjust usage within homes and businesses. Customers might, for example, agree to let a utility remotely turn off their air conditioners at times of peak use in exchange for a discount.

But to receive the stimulus money, utilities will have to install new devices across their entire customer base quickly. Security experts say that this could lead to problems down the road--as-yet-unknown vulnerabilities in hardware and software could open up new ways for attackers to manipulate equipment and take control of the energy supply.

Smart-grid deployments involve installing smart meters in homes and businesses across a utility's coverage area. These meters can communicate with the utility and with other networked devices--usually via a wireless network of some type. Some ways to hijack this type of equipment have already been revealed. Last year, Mike Davis, a senior security consultant at IOActive, created a piece of software that could spread automatically between smart grid hardware in different homes. The software would then be capable of shutting equipment down.

The security of the smart grid was a major topic at Black Hat. The conference brings together researchers from academia, industry, government, and the hacking underground.

See the full Story via external site: www.technologyreview.com



Most recent stories in this category (Connectivity):

19/02/2017: Google hails net balloon ‘breakthrough’

05/02/2017: Researchers break data transfer efficiency record

24/01/2017: Net Neutrality in for bumpy ride with Trump Administration Communications Chief

12/01/2017: Google confirms end of global internet access drone project

31/12/2016: UK: The farmer who built her own broadband

23/12/2016: US Government to require cars be able to talk to each other

23/12/2016: Broadband boost for remotest parts of UK

14/12/2016: Connectivity Issues: UK government 'must take action' on 5G