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 New method can speed development of organic semiconductors for flexible displays

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Date posted: 19/08/2011

A team led by researchers at Stanford and Harvard universities has developed a new organic semiconductor material that is among the speediest yet in the search for a fast, durable organic semiconductor. The scientists also accelerated the development process by using a predictive approach that lopped many months or years off the typical timeline.

Organic semiconductors hold immense promise for use in thin-film and flexible displays — picture an iPad you can roll up — but they haven’t yet reached the speeds needed to drive high definition displays. For the most part, developing a new organic electronic material has been a time-intensive, somewhat hit-or-miss process, requiring researchers to synthesize large numbers of candidate materials and then test them.

The researchers decided to try a computational predictive approach to substantially narrow the field of candidates before expending the time and energy to make any of them.

The researchers used a material known as DNTT, which had already been shown to be a good organic semiconductor, as their starting point, then considered various compounds possessing chemical and electrical properties that seemed likely to enhance the parent material’s performance if they were attached.

They came up with seven promising candidates.

See the full Story via external site: www.kurzweilai.net



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