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 Plans to print a gun halted as 3D printer is seized

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Date posted: 03/10/2012

A US project to create a printable gun has been derailed after the company supplying the 3D printer withdrew it.

In a letter published on the Wiki Weapon website, Stratasys said that it did not allow its printers "to be used for illegal purposes".

Defense Distributed, the group behind the project, had planned to share 3D weapon blueprints online.

Currently it is legal in the US to manufacture a gun at home without a licence.

Defense Distributed raised $20,000 (12,400) online to get the Wiki Weapon project started.

It planned to develop a fully printable 3D gun, initially with no moving parts.

"This project could very well change the way we think about gun control and consumption," it said on its site.

"How do governments behave if they must one day operate on the assumption that any and every citizen has near instant access to a firearm through the internet?"

But the project hit a snag when the firm supplying the 3D printer got wind of what they were planning.

See the full Story via external site: www.bbc.co.uk



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