Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Reliable communication, unreliable networks

This story is from the category Connectivity
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 08/08/2013

Now that the Internet’s basic protocols are more than 30 years old, network scientists are increasingly turning their attention to ad hoc networks — communications networks set up, on the fly, by wireless devices — where unsolved problems still abound.

Most theoretical analyses of ad hoc networks have assumed that the communications links within the network are stable. But that often isn’t the case with real-world wireless devices — as anyone who’s used a cellphone knows.

At the Association for Computing Machinery’s Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing in July, past and present researchers from the Theory of Distributed Systems Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory presented a new framework for analyzing ad hoc networks in which the quality of the communications links fluctuates. Within that framework, they provide mathematical bounds on the efficiency with which messages can propagate through the network, and they describe new algorithms that can achieve maximal efficiency.

“There’s been a discrepancy between the theory, with its idealized models, and the reality of wireless networks,” says Nancy Lynch, the NEC Professor of Software Science and Engineering at MIT and head of the Theory of Distributed Systems Group. “When people start designing theoretical algorithms, they tend to rely too heavily on the specific assumptions of the models. So the algorithms tend to be unrealistic and fragile.”

In the past, some researchers have tried to model the unreliability of network links as random fluctuations. “But if you assume real randomness, then you can count on the randomness,” Lynch says. “Somehow you can use that in your algorithm. Maybe randomness itself is giving you an assumption that’s too strong.”

See the full Story via external site: web.mit.edu



Most recent stories in this category (Connectivity):

19/02/2017: Google hails net balloon ‘breakthrough’

05/02/2017: Researchers break data transfer efficiency record

24/01/2017: Net Neutrality in for bumpy ride with Trump Administration Communications Chief

12/01/2017: Google confirms end of global internet access drone project

31/12/2016: UK: The farmer who built her own broadband

23/12/2016: US Government to require cars be able to talk to each other

23/12/2016: Broadband boost for remotest parts of UK

14/12/2016: Connectivity Issues: UK government 'must take action' on 5G