Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Mimicking nature’s cellular architectures via 3D printing

This story is from the category Computer Aided Manufacture
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 08/02/2017

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being compressed.

The plant’s hardiness comes from a combination of its hollow, tubular macrostructure and porous, or cellular, microstructure. These architectural features work together to give grass its robust mechanical properties.

Inspired by natural cellular structures, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, and MIT have developed a new method to 3D print materials with independently tunable macro-and microscale porosity using a ceramic foam ink.

Their approach could be used to fabricate lightweight structural materials, thermal insulation or tissue scaffolds.

The research is published in the Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Science.

“By expanding the compositional space of printable materials, we can produce lightweight structures with exceptional stiffness,” said Jennifer Lewis, Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at SEAS and senior author of the paper. Lewis is also a Core Faculty Member of the Wyss.

The ceramic foam ink used by the Lewis Lab contains alumina particles, water, and air.

“Foam inks are interesting because you can digitally pattern cellular microstructures within larger cellular macrostructures,” said Joseph Muth, a graduate student in the Lewis Lab and first author of the paper. “After the ink solidifies, the resulting structure consists of air surrounded by ceramic material on multiple length scales. As you incorporate porosity into the structure, you impart properties that it otherwise would not have.”

See the full Story via external site: www.seas.harvard.edu



Most recent stories in this category (Computer Aided Manufacture):

08/02/2017: Scientists develop ‘lab on a chip’ that costs a penny to make

08/02/2017: Mimicking nature’s cellular architectures via 3D printing

12/01/2017: Additive manufacturing: 3D Printing Stretchable Electronics?

23/12/2016: Myanmar farmers reap rewards from 3D printing

17/02/2015: Worlds first compact rotary 3D printer-cum-scanner unveiled at AAAS by NTU Singapore start-up

16/09/2014: Iowa State GeoFabLab prints 3-D rocks, fossils; advances geoscience research, education

21/08/2014: Louisiana Tech researchers use 3D printers to create custom medical implants

05/08/2014: 3D printing finds its 'sweet spot' through 'nifty shades of grey'