Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 CamSpace Creates a Wii For Everyone (Minus the Nintendo Console)

This story is from the category Sensors
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 17/06/2008

CamTrax's CamSpace software converts nearly any object into an input device, using an ordinary PC webcam to track up to four objects - each as small as up to 5mm - in real-time and with high accuracy and reliability.






A disadvantage is the current software is Windows only.

Yaron Tanne, founder & CEO of CamTrax Technologies, the company behind CamSpace, has been developing the technology practically single-handedly for three years in his apartment in Tel-Aviv.

Tanne claims that most of the algorithms used are in the public domain but have been enhanced. There are also completely new algorithms developed from scratch.

CamSpace requires an agent application to run locally in order to emulate a mouse, a keyboard, joystick, or other input device. Users can then program the emulation based on the game they want to control and the object(s) they want to control the game with. For example, one user could program a steering wheel for a racing game, where moving the wheel on the Z axis shifts the gears up and down. A different user can use two objects for the same game, programming the second object, say a coke bottle, to shift the gears.

See the full Story via external site: www.techcrunch.com



Most recent stories in this category (Sensors):

28/02/2017: DJI drones use plane avoidance tech

19/02/2017: Ford developing pothole alert system for drivers

08/02/2017: Pioneering chip extends sensors’ battery life

04/02/2017: Sensor Networks for Rangeland Animals

04/02/2017: Cardiff Uni bid to create osteoarthritis 'smart patch'

31/01/2017: Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis

12/01/2017: Uber to share data to help ease city congestion

23/12/2016: Electronic 'hairy skin' could give robots a more human sense of touch