Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Hearing the words beneath the noise

This story is from the category Sensors
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 05/08/2009

Hearing aids and cochlear implants act as tiny amplifiers so the deaf and hard-of-hearing can make sense of voices and music. Unfortunately, these devices also amplify background sound, so they're less effective in a noisy environment like a busy workplace or caf?.

But help is on the way. Prof. Miriam Furst-Yust of Tel Aviv University's School of Electrical Engineering has developed a new software application named "Clearcall" for cochlear implants and hearing aids which improves speech recognition for the hard-of-hearing by up to 50%.

"Hearing-impaired people have a real problem understanding speech," says Prof. Furst-Yust. "Their devices may be useful in a quiet room, but once the background noise levels ramp up, the devices become less useful. Our algorithm helps filter out irrelevant noise so they can better understand the voices of their friends and family."

Based on a cochlear model that she devised, the new patented technology is now being developed to improve the capabilities of existing cochlear implants and digital hearing aids. Adding Clearcall to current technology is quite straightforward, says Prof. Furst-Yust, and requires only add-on software for existing devices.

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



Most recent stories in this category (Sensors):

28/02/2017: DJI drones use plane avoidance tech

19/02/2017: Ford developing pothole alert system for drivers

08/02/2017: Pioneering chip extends sensors’ battery life

04/02/2017: Sensor Networks for Rangeland Animals

04/02/2017: Cardiff Uni bid to create osteoarthritis 'smart patch'

31/01/2017: Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis

12/01/2017: Uber to share data to help ease city congestion

23/12/2016: Electronic 'hairy skin' could give robots a more human sense of touch