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 Using Brain Waves to Help Treat Depression

This story is from the category The Brain
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Date posted: 23/09/2009

Researchers conducted a study at 9 sites in the U.S. with 375 people suffering from major depression. The testing takes about 15 minutes and could help people suffering from depression find fast relief.

In the study researchers used a customized version of quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) to study brainwave patterns.

Brain waves are measured by a few electrodes attached to a strap that is placed around a patient's forehead. The electrodes plugs into a device that digitizes and filters the EEG signals from the brain. The device is then plugged into a computer for analysis.

The device, which is developed by Aspect Medical Systems, does not require any long term specialized training. In only a few hours a doctor or assistant can begin using the device for patient analysis.

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



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