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 CSIRO researchers create giant waves - virtually

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Date posted: 03/12/2009

CSIRO scientists have created 'rogue waves' more than 20 metres high and smashed them into virtual oil and gas production platforms to compare different mooring designs.

The computer modelling project compares how different types of semi-submersible oil rigs withstand the effects of giant waves in the open ocean.

Rogue waves are rare, extreme events that pose a risk to shipping and offshore structures and can lead to loss of life.

They differ from tsunamis, which only grow large when they reach shallow water.

CSIRO scientist and keen surfer, Dr Murray Rudman, said rogue waves were once considered folklore, but wave height monitoring data has blown that myth out of the water.

?Rogue waves are huge waves that sometimes seem to come out of nowhere and, in recent years, they?ve been a major topic of scientific research,? Dr Rudman said.

CSIRO is using fluid-flow mathematics and computer modelling to assist in the sensible and safe design of oil platforms.

Modelling rogue waves? effects enables researchers to conduct experiments - which would normally involve the use of huge water tanks - more cheaply, accurately and quickly.

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



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