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 A Helmet to Prevent Paralysis

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Date posted: 06/01/2010

Helmets for everything from football and hockey to motorcycle riding are built to protect the head from impact. Each successive generation of design is better at dissipating force and protecting against concussions and other knocks to the skull. But current helmets can still do little to prevent the spinal injuries that cause paralysis.

Now researchers at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver are working on a design that could protect the spine during a head-on collision. When a person's head hits a flat object straight on, the impact normally causes the neck to crumple as it absorbs the brunt of the force. If a broken vertebra dissects or otherwise damages the delicate spinal cord, the result can be permanent paralysis. If the head hits an object at an angle, it can glance off without much damage--that's why football players are taught to tackle opponents with their heads raised.

"I became interested in whether there was a way to convert the impact against a flat object into an impact against an angled object," says Peter Cripton, the mechanical engineer and biomechanics specialist at UBC who led the project. He and his colleagues developed the "Pro-Neck-Tor" helmet, which consists of an outer shell that looks like most helmets on the market today, a rotating inner shell that hugs the head, and a mechanism that connects the two.

"The main purpose of helmets, whether in sports or transportation, is always to prevent brain injuries. We're trying to do something quite different," Cripton says. "We're working toward a helmet with the same ability to prevent concussion, but also with the ability to prevent neck injuries." During normal, day-to-day use, the inner shell remains immobile. But when the helmet hits something with enough force, the inner mechanism releases, and the inner shell rotates, guiding the head as if it were hitting an angled surface instead of a flat one.

See the full Story via external site: www.technologyreview.com



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