Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 In reversing motor nerve damage, time is of the essence

This story is from the category The Brain
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 04/10/2011

When a motor nerve is severely damaged, people rarely recover full muscle strength and function. Neuroscientists from Children's Hospital Boston, combining patient data with observations in a mouse model, now show why. It's not that motor nerve fibers don't regrow -- they can -- but they don't grow fast enough. By the time they get to the muscle fibers, they can no longer communicate with them.

The study, published in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation (online October 3) has immediate implications for patients with motor nerve injuries, including carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, nerve damage caused by surgery and brachial avulsion injuries: Time is of the essence in repairing nerve damage.

"There's a clock ticking, and if you're too late, the muscle cannot be functionally reactivated," says Clifford Woolf, Ph.D, senior investigator and director of the Program in Neurobiology and F.M. Kirby Neurobiology Center at Children's Hospital Boston. "If there's muscle weakness, waiting six months to see if it gets better or worse before intervening may not be the best idea."

See the full Story via external site: medicalxpress.com



Most recent stories in this category (The Brain):

04/02/2017: HKU scientists utilise innovative neuroimaging approach to unravel complex brain networks

26/01/2017: Personality linked to 'differences in brain structure'

12/01/2017: Donkey Kong used to Help Guide New Approaches in Neuroscience

10/12/2016: Doctors use deep-brain ultrasound therapy to treat tremors

17/02/2015: Hearing experts break sound barrier for children born without hearing nerve

17/02/2015: Smoking thins vital part of brain

05/02/2015: Intracranial Stimulation Proved Efficient in the Recovery of Learning and Memory in Rats

05/02/2015: Repeated head blows linked to smaller brain volume and slower processing speeds