Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Wearable defibrillator can prevent death in people with arrhythmias

This story is from the category Health
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 13/11/2011

A wearable defibrillator can prevent sudden death in people with dangerous heart arrhythmias, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011.

Wearable cardioverter defibrillators are used by people who may be at higher risk for sudden cardiac arrest, including those with weakened heart function, awaiting cardiac transplant or with a condition that prevents or delays them from receiving an implanted defibrillator.

The device monitors heart rhythm, emits alarms if a serious arrhythmia occurs, delivers an electric shock to the heart if needed and alerts bystanders to help if the heart's electrical activity has stopped.

About 5,000 patients are using wearable defibrillators at any one time, usually for about 60 days, said Vincent N. Mosesso Jr., M.D., professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and principal investigator of the study.

"In these patients, the wearable defibrillator is a non-invasive 'insurance policy' against sudden arrest during their vulnerable period," he said.

Researchers gathered heart rhythm records and calls about shocks from a registry of 14,475 patients with wearable defibrillators listed from 2007 through 2009. Of those, 185 (about 1 percent) received an appropriate shock and 91.6 percent survived one or more episodes of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia, the most common abnormal rhythms during cardiac arrest.

See the full Story via external site: medicalxpress.com



Most recent stories in this category (Health):

03/03/2017: Interactive health apps may inspire healthy behaviors, but watch the tone

31/01/2017: Surgical eye robot performs precision-injection in patient with retinal vein occlusion

31/01/2017: Assessment of comatose patients through telemedicine efforts shown to be reliable

12/01/2017: Wearable biosensors can flag illness, Lyme disease, risk for diabetes; low airplane oxygen

31/12/2016: Drone-based blood deliveries in Tanzania to be funded by UK

23/12/2016: Researchers combat antimicrobial resistance using smartphones

14/12/2016: Snapchat spectacles worn by UK surgeon while operating

02/06/2015: Staring Pain in the Face – Software Reads Kids’ Expressions to Measure Pain Levels