Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Quantum Computer Get Nudge from New Research

This story is from the category Pure Research
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 25/02/2012

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the nanoscale and the ever-elusive quantum computer are among the advancements edging closer toward the realm of possibility, and a new study co-authored by a UC Santa Barbara researcher may give both an extra nudge.

The findings recently appeared in Science Express, an online version of the journal Science.

Ania Bleszynski Jayich, an assistant professor of physics who joined the UCSB faculty in 2010, spent a year at Harvard working on an experiment that coupled nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to nanomechanical resonators. That project is the basis for the new paper, "Coherent sensing of a mechanical resonator with a single spin qubit."

A nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center is a specific defect in diamond that exhibits a quantum magnetic behavior known as spin. When a single spin in diamond is coupled with a magnetic mechanical resonator -- a device used to generate or select specific frequencies -- it points toward the potential for a new nanoscale sensing technique with implications for biology and technology, Jayich explained.

Among those possible future applications of such a technique is magnetic resonance imaging on a scale small enough to image the structure of proteins -- an as-yet unaccomplished feat that Jayich called "one of the holy grails of structural biology."

"The same physics that will allow the NV center to detect the magnetic field of the resonator, hopefully, will allow MRI on the nanoscale," Jayich said. "It could make MRI more accurate, and able to see more. It's like having a camera with eight megapixels versus one with two megapixels and taking a picture of someone's face. You can't see features that are smaller than the size of a pixel. So do they have three freckles, or do they all look like one big freckle?

"That's the idea," Jayich continued. "To resolve individual freckles, so to speak, to see what a protein is made up of. What we found in this paper suggests that it is possible, although a significant amount of work still needs to be done."

See the full Story via external site: www.sciencedaily.com



Most recent stories in this category (Pure Research):

08/02/2017: New algorithms by U of T researchers may revolutionize drug discoveries

18/08/2014: RTI International develops novel lung-on-a-chip

30/04/2014: New lab-on-a-chip device overcomes miniaturization problems

25/03/2014: Robotic arm probes chemistry of 3-D objects by mass spectrometry

05/03/2014: First step towards “programmable materials“ - Sheet metal that never rattles

20/02/2014: Team Develops Multi-scale Simulation Software for Chemistry Research

17/10/2013: Fat Black Holes Grown up in Cities: Observational result using Virtual Observatory

26/09/2013: Simulation accurately captures the evolution of ancient complex societies