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 Graphics Algorithm: Impacted Water

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Date posted: 31/01/2009

Researchers at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the University of Twente in the Netherlands and the University of Seville in Spain have explained the formation and behaviour of the very fast water jet that is formed when an object impacts on a water surface.

Observations were made via super-fast camera, then a 3D computer simulation was built up via physics to create the same patterns, and torn apart to understand how it works.



The simulation of a stone being dropped into water is shown above, at a blazingly fast frame rate of 1,500 frames per second. This level of detail is necessary to fully understand the process, and develop a less computationally intensive algorithm to replicate it.

If one drops a stone into a pond, a very rapid, thin jet of water spouts upwards. This is an everyday phenomenon that occurs frequently in nature and industry. However, the rich and complex dynamics underlying such a system are only revealed if viewed using high-speed.

Publication: High-Speed Jet Formation after Solid Object Impact, Physical Review Letters, 23 January, 2009.

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



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