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 New Neuroprosthetic Treatment for the Chronically Depressed

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Date posted: 02/09/2009

A University of Adelaide study has found that mild and repeated doses of magnetic brain stimulation can be an effective treatment for chronic depression.

Psychiatry Professor Cherrie Galletly says 38 patients with a major depressive disorder have shown a clear improvement after undertaking treatment with magnetic brain stimulation for 30 minutes at a time.

"At the start of the study, all participants met the criteria for moderate to severe depression and most had contemplated suicide," Professor Galletly says. "After treatment, 12 patients had made a full recovery and many others showed significant improvement. A six-month follow up of 11 patients showed the improvement was sustained."

The ongoing study, conducted at the Adelaide Clinic, involves people who have severe, long-term depression lasting up to 20 years. In 87% of cases, the participants had trialled five or more antidepressants.

"Preliminary results indicate that 12 transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatments, given three days a week over a month, may be sufficient to achieve good results," Professor Galletly says.

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



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