Untitled Document
Not a member yet? Register for full benefits!

Username
Password
 Researchers produce first Iraqi-to-English speech-to-speech translation app

This story is from the category Artificial Intelligence
Printer Friendly Version
Email to a Friend (currently Down)

 

 

Date posted: 02/05/2010

Researchers at Jibbigo LLC and Carnegie Mellon University's International Center for Advanced Communication Technologies (interACT) have developed a new application for Apple's iPhone 3GS that performs speech-to-speech and speech-to-text translation between English and the Iraqi dialect of Arabic.

A user speaks either English or Iraqi Arabic into the iPhone and the Jibbigo app produces a spoken and text translation in the other language. The software, now available from Jibbigo through the iPhone App Store, operates on the iPhone itself, so it can operate as a freestanding communicator without the need to be connected to the Web or a phone network.

"We're proud that this powerful speech translation tool can now provide critical communication support for humanitarian and government efforts in crisis zones," said Alex Waibel, director of interACT and founder of Jibbigo. "This Iraqi/English translation application is designed to help service personnel, whether their role is military, humanitarian aid or engineering, so they can overcome the confusion and misunderstanding that can occur when language is a barrier."

The Iraqi translator takes advantage of speech translation work by interACT that was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Spoken Language Communication and Translation System for Tactical Use (Transtac) Program. The goal of interACT and other Transtac contractors was to develop portable, two-way translation systems for use in Iraq and other non-English-speaking nations where the military is or might be deployed.

"We have developed some very capable translation software during the course of the program, but with the exception of some field tests, a working system has never been fully deployed in Iraq," said Waibel, a professor of computer science and language technologies in Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science. "The iPhone and the iPhone App Store, however, now provide us with a means of rapidly making this software widely available for use by anybody."

See the full Story via external site: www.physorg.com



Most recent stories in this category (Artificial Intelligence):

03/03/2017: Application of Fuzzy Logic Teaches Drones to land on Moving Targets

02/03/2017: Poker-playing AI program first to beat pros at no-limit Texas hold 'em

05/02/2017: Google's driverless cars make progress

04/02/2017: Study Exposes Major Flaw in Turing Test

31/01/2017: Artificial intelligence uncovers new insight into biophysics of cancer

31/01/2017: Hungry penguins help keep smart car code safe

12/01/2017: First ever perched landing performed using machine learning algorithms

12/01/2017: AI takes on humans in marathon poker game