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Podcast: When it comes to tech, simplicity sells

Podcast Source:

View Podcast Online? Yes

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/david_pogue_says_simplicity_sells.html

Podcast length: 21 minutes 26 Seconds

Podcast Description

This cast from TED 2006, argues at how, no matter what the technology is, if it is going to sell, it must be as simple to use for the end-user, as possible.


Presenter Biographies

David Pogue

David Pogue is the personal technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy Award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. He's also one of the world's bestselling how-to authors, with titles in the For Dummies series and his own line of "Missing Manual" books.


Transcript Available? No

Audio file available? Yes

6.7 MB

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/download/audio/17/talk/7

Podcast Download? Yes

70.4 MB

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/download/video/4021/talk/7


Podcast viewing notes

This podcast opens on a song, one taking the piss out of voicemail tech support, sung to piano music. It's funny, but at the same time, makes its point abundantly clear: a technology designed to be user friendly, has ended up being the source of frustration and lost productivity.

He says there is a problem with gadgets that many now are starting to feel it is too much technology, too fast, and changing too quickly. The technology is often good, but at the speed its passing, people just don't allocate time to sit down and study the controls. If its not immediately obvious, they won't in the mainstay, use it.

Part of the problem is that for software, companies derive 35% of the operating profit from upgrades, so they keep pumping the patches out.

"If you improve a piece of software enough times, you essentially ruin it."

When it comes to design, break any rule except intelligence. All other rules of interface design can be thrown away if they break intelligently designing as you would ue.

At 12:58, he cannot help himself any longer, and launches into "The Bill Gates Song" at the piano, mocking Microsoft's take on 'intelligent design'.

Steve Jobs is also mocked in song, just to be fair.


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